It is Not Easy

No one ever said it was easy to live with ADHD. Well, there are people who claim that it doesn’t exist, but they’re just one more part of having ADHD that makes...

It is Not Easy
29August
It is Not Easy
29August

It is Not Easy

Written by Ben Cecil
in Section Behavioral Health

No one ever said it was easy to live with ADHD.

Well, there are people who claim that it doesn’t exist, but they’re just one more part of having ADHD that makes it difficult.

And this post is not about them, let’s pretend they don’t exist, see how they like that.

No, this post is about a specific scenario that many of us, perhaps all of us, have lived through repeatedly.

Read the original article published on PsychCentral.com on August 30th. 2019 and written by Kelly Babcock.

This is about “I Can Do That!”

The phrase, “I can do that.” pops up in our speech way more often than it should. We might be in a meeting and we might be excited about what is going to happen, the thing that the meeting is about. We might have been tapped to do the one thing that is right up our alley and that will get us excited and will make us hungry for the project to start.

And then the person leading the meeting will say something like, “Of course, before any of this can begin we need to fold ten thousand pieces of card stock into three-dimensional widgets that will always land standing up when dropped anywhere. It’s really a simple process involving 17 individual folds and the addition of a balanced weight after the thirteenth fold, and each one has to be done individually.”

Of course …

What we hear is, “Of course, before any of this can begin we need to fold blah blah card stock into blah blah widgets blah blah wait after thirteen blah blah blah.”

And we’re so excited for the project to start that we think, “I didn’t really hear all of that, but I can do that!”

No, not entirely true, we think “I can do that!”

In fairness

Many of us get an immediate feeling that we may have overstepped our abilities, it feels like a cold lump of lead-weighted ice in our stomach … but just a small one.

After all, how difficult could it be for a wunderkind like me, right?

And I’ve got what, some days in which to do it, they said days and a number, right? I’m sure there is an adequate amount of time, there has to be.

Did someone say time?

Yeah, see, now, time, us, not a good mix.

Too much time and we forget about the widget folding, putting it off to concentrate on the upcoming project and how exciting that will be. Vroom, vroom. “X” citing with a capitol EX!

Too little time and we’re already confused because how could they have not scheduled enough time? Was I supposed to say I could be part of the team that takes this on and not what I did say which was likely something like, “Ooooh, meeeeee, pick me, I do!! Yes. Yes! YES!!”

Or …

Or they scheduled exactly enough time and I, a person with ADHD, and therefore a person with no appreciation of the measurements of time or time requirements of any given job, assumed that there was either not enough time to even bother starting or way more time than I need. In either case, see above, as there is no such thing as the right amount of time.

So, as you can see, it isn’t easy to live with ADHD and this situation which I have described in part is a prime example.

Tune in next time when I will continue this discussion about the job that was going to be the best ever.

I think I’ve scheduled just enough time to write it for you.

Yeah, maybe even more time than I need … I hope.

Ben Cecil profile image

Author: Ben Cecil

Ben Cecil specializes in helping adolescents and their families to recover from drug and alcohol addiction. Ben obtained his Bachelor’s...

Ben Cecil specializes in helping adolescents and their families to recover from drug and alcohol addiction. Ben obtained his Bachelor’s degree from Hampshire College and has more than ten years of...